Picture of Maria Fernanda Mejia-Salazar

Maria Fernanda Mejia-Salazar Post-doctoral research fellow, Department of Veterinary Pathology

Address
WCVM 2732

Academic Credentials

  • Doctor in Philosophy, Behavioral and Disease Ecology, University of Saskatchewan, Canada. 2017
  • Doctor in Veterinary Medicine and Husbandry (with Distinction), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico, 2005. 

Research Interests

  • Understanding the way diseases are transmitted among animals is vital for their conservation and management. At the Department of Veterinary Pathology, my research has focused on wildlife behavior and disease ecology. I am particularly interested in the influence of host social behavior on spatiotemporal dynamics of disease. Right now, my research focuses on mule deer behavior and chronic wasting disease transmission in the Canadian prairies under the supervision of Dr Trent Bollinger and Dr Cheryl Waldner.   

Publications

  • Mejía Salazar MF (2017). Social dynamics among mule deer and how they visit various environmental areas: implications for chronic wasting disease transmission (Doctoral dissertation, University of Saskatchewan). https://goo.gl/SEV1GT 
  • Mejía-Salazar MF, Goldizen AW, Menz CS, Dwyer RG, Blomberg SP, Waldner CL, Cullingham C, & Bollinger TK (2017). Mule deer spatial association patterns and potential implications for transmission of an epizootic disease. PLoS ONE12(4), e0175385. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175385   https://goo.gl/3XgQ97 
  • Mejía Salazar MF, Waldner C, Stookey J, & Bollinger TK (2016). Infectious disease and grouping patterns in mule deer. PLoS ONE11(3), e0150830. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150830   https://goo.gl/L1TEp3
  • Reiczigel J, Mejía Salazar MF, Bollinger TK, & Rózsa L (2015). Comparing radio-tracking and visual detection methods to quantify group size measures. European Journal of Ecology1(2), 1-4. Doi: 10.1515/eje-2015-0011  https://goo.gl/JerfFx
  • Mejía Salazar MF (2007). Guía para estimular la crianza por la madre de mamíferos neotropicales y compartidos de México y Centroamérica en cautiverio. (Bachelor degree dissertation, UNAM).